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Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

Yuma Proving Ground Hosts Foreign Military Weapons Testing

Artillery responds to changes in climate, and when soldiers want to test weapons in a hot, dry environment, one of the places they come to—is a Yuma Army Base. And it’s not just U.S. military operations. Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports. Yuma Proving Ground is a military testing facility that straddles Yuma and La Paz Counties. It is here on this expanse of desert larger than the state of Rhode Island that new weapons are examined, old ammunition is tested for...
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There are apps that can help people with diabetes keep track of their blood sugar and apps that can attach to a blood pressure cuff and store blood pressure information. I use an app called ZocDoc to schedule and manage doctor's appointments. Every time I see a therapist or a primary care doctor or dentist, the data get stored in my personal account.

From a drama-inducing email leak to a pattern of audible interruptions from protesters throughout, the unification of the Democratic Party remained a bit of a question mark as the convention drew to a close on Thursday evening. Despite a lineup of speakers intended to calm the anxieties of the delegates and a plea from Sen.

In Rwanda, some consider feminism a dirty word, says NPR's Gregory Warner in his Invisibilia podcast. It's shorthand for too aggressive, too liberated, too selfish. Yet women in Rwanda hold 64 percent of the seats in parliament — more than any other country.

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

Larry the Lobster was poised to be an inspirational tale.

The 15-pound lobster was at least in his 60s, according to scientists who spoke to the Portland Press Herald and ABC News, when he found his way from the sea to a seafood supplier.

Jeff Melluso, a chef and owner of a restaurant in Sunrise, Fla., pulled him out and propelled him to fame.

Avant garde theater director Rachel Chavkin's career is exploding. Sitting in one of her shows might mean sitting in silence or knocking back shots of vodka, while an actor sings from War and Peace right next to you. Chavkin has two shows running off-Broadway now and a show opening on Broadway this fall.

Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice is a troubling comedy.

The play's villain is Shylock, a Jewish moneylender. He gives one of his Christian tormentors a loan on the condition that if the merchant doesn't repay, Shylock gets a pound of the borrower's flesh.

While Shylock does give a famous speech that nobly decries de-humanization of the Jews, the play is full of anti-Semitic language and ideas.

You know the TV game show Who Wants to be a Millionaire? Typically, winners get big money — like $1 million — but it's a little different in the version played in Venezuela.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The United Nations suspended food and relief aid to dangerous and hard-to-access areas in northeastern Nigeria, amid a catastrophic humanitarian crisis affecting half a million people. The move comes after Boko Haram ambushed a humanitarian convoy.

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