From the KAWC Newsroom

Yuma County Indivisible Tax Day March

A new local group Saturday will join with similar groups nationwide to ask President Donald Trump to release his tax returns. KAWC's Kim Johnson talked with Fred Brown, a spokesperson for the group Yuma County Indivisible.

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Arizona Science Desk Talk April 19

Arizona Science Desk Discusses Future of Science Journalism

When the nation's communities at large think about science, they don't always think of Arizona. The Arizona Science Desk, a two year collaboration among the Arizona NPR stations, sought to change that, by raising the statewide and national profile of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) news in Arizona.

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Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Two dozen dead and hundreds sickened from contaminated drugs with probably more to come. The outbreak of fungal meningitis has scared many thousands more who received injections of what may have been tainted steroids from a now-closed facility in Massachusetts, which called itself a compounding pharmacy.

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

People around the world asked questions after a court in Italy issued prison sentences for scientists convicted of failure to warn the public of an earthquake. In 2009, a temblor devastated the city of L'Aquila and killed more than 300 people shortly after a group of geologists had met to talk about a series of smaller shocks, but scientists around the world say there is no way to predict an earthquake with any kind of accuracy. Aside from that trial, Italy plays a crucial role in the euro crisis.

As part of NPR's coverage of this year's presidential election, All Things Considered asked three science reporters to weigh in on the race. The result is a three-part series on the science of leadership. In Part 1, Alix Spiegel looked at the personalities of American presidents. In Part 2, Jon Hamilton examined leadership in the animal kingdom.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Donald Trump returned to the headlines, offering $5 million if President Obama would release college and passport records. Jay Leno brought this up when the president appeared on "The Tonight Show."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE TONIGHT SHOW")

JAY LENO: What's this thing with Trump and you? I don't - it's like me and Letterman. What has he got against you?

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: This all dates back to when we were growing up together in Kenya.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Concerns about problems at the polls appear to be greater and coming earlier than usual this election year. Already, mysterious phone calls in Florida and Virginia have told voters they can vote by phone — which they cannot do.

And until this week, there were anonymous billboards in Ohio and Wisconsin warning that voter fraud is a felony — which it is.

There are more ways than ever to watch TV programs on the Internet, from Netflix and Amazon to Hulu. But many viewers discover that watching TV on the Web can be frustrating. Their favorite show might suddenly stop, stutter and be replaced by a note that reads "buffering." The problem is lack of bandwidth: The data that is the video just can't squeeze through the wires and onto the screen.

"The word 'ivory' rang in the air, was whispered, was sighed. You would think they were praying to it." — Joseph Conrad in Heart of Darkness

Conrad wrote more than a century ago, when there were no laws against shooting elephants. If anything, today's restrictions on the ivory trade have only increased its value.

This weekend, a slew of newspapers in key swing states including Ohio are expected to release their endorsements for the presidency and other elected positions.

Such external validation is highly prized by candidates, but it's no longer entirely clear why.

In a number of swing states, early voting means many people are already casting their ballots. Typically, that entails voting by mail or visiting a county elections office.

But in Iowa, satellite voting — where "pop-up" polling stations allow people to vote at convenient times and nontraditional locations — is growing in popularity.

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April 19

Author Melissa Sevigny reads from Mythical River

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