Korva Coleman

Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Coleman's work has been recognized by the Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. In 1983, she was nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University. She studied law at Georgetown University Law Center.

Update at 6:00 p.m. ET:

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder has signed into law two controversial "right-to-work" bills passed earlier Tuesday by the state's House. This officially makes Michigan the 24th right-to-work state in the nation.

The two bills give both public and private employees so-called right-to-work protections — controversial pieces of legislation that have sparked protests in and around the state capitol in Lansing.

Some outraged protesters remain around the Egyptian presidential palace in Cairo today, as opponents of President Mohammed Morsi defy his recent ruling granting himself executive powers that can't be questioned by a court.

Now there's word he may have signed a new order allowing soldiers to detain and arrest civilians, a right that's reserved for police officers.

Former Florida neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman says NBC Universal's editorial decisions made him look like a racist when the network covered the shooting and killing of teenager Trayvon Martin.

A day after the story broke, the news remains stunning — CIA director and retired Gen. David Petraeus resigns in a lightning stroke, admitting he used extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital affair.

It's shocking because Petraeus is considered an extremely able leader who's been judged by this single word, says NPR's Tom Bowman: Iraq.

An explosive report from the New York Times today spelled out just how wealthy the relatives of Chinese prime minister Wen Jiabao are. Try $2.7 billion dollars in assets. This startling news so angered Chinese officials that the Times' website was quickly shut down in China.

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