Maya Springhawk Robnett

Arizona Science Desk Reporter

Maya Springhawk Robnett is the Arizona Science Desk reporter for KAWC.

Maya grew up in the Southwest and began attending Arizona Western College in Yuma at the age of fourteen.  At seventeen, she graduated with her AA in Studio Art.

From May 2012 to September 2014, Maya volunteered then worked part-time at KAWC as the News & Operations Assistant/Reporter while working towards her degree in Mass Communication and Media Studies at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism.  Maya's coverage included a diverse range of topics, from mixed martial arts in Yuma to the local foster care system. 

Maya also produced KAWC's Work Stories series for more than a year, focusing on the daily lives and stories of those making a living in Yuma County. 

Maya left KAWC to finish her degree and returned in May 2016 to cover science in the region.

She is a violinist, poet, and sculptor.

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Andrew Cattoir / National Park Service

Water levels in Lake Mead, which stores water for Arizona, California, and Nevada, have plunged in recent years.  If levels drop below a certain point, they trigger an official shortage.  But as Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports, the three states are trying to avoid that…

Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

Efforts to protect the country's agricultural crops from pathogens and other threats requires some unusual practices.  Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports from the fields of Yuma...

Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

It has been an unusually wet winter thus far for the sunniest city in the world and meteorologists predict the trend will continue.  The recent rainfall in Yuma County is causing problems for local farmers.  Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports.

Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

How to create a backyard oasis is the focus of a community program in Yuma. What began as an effort to help home gardeners has become a scientific resource for the community.

Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

Data used to drive decisions about how to manage land and wildlife in the Southwest can come from unexpected sources. Whether counting birds or hunting them, people who enjoy the outdoors are contributing to the science of wildlife management. Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

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