Maya Springhawk Robnett

Arizona Science Desk Reporter

Maya Springhawk Robnett is the Arizona Science Desk reporter for KAWC.

Maya grew up in the Southwest and began attending Arizona Western College in Yuma at the age of fourteen.  At seventeen, she graduated with her AA in Studio Art.

From May 2012 to September 2014, Maya volunteered then worked part-time at KAWC as the News & Operations Assistant/Reporter while working towards her degree in Mass Communication and Media Studies at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism.  Maya's coverage included a diverse range of topics, from mixed martial arts in Yuma to the local foster care system. 

Maya also produced KAWC's Work Stories series for more than a year, focusing on the daily lives and stories of those making a living in Yuma County. 

Maya left KAWC to finish her degree and returned in May 2016 to cover science in the region.

She is a violinist, poet, and sculptor.

Ways to Connect

Centers for Disease Control

The Health Resources and Services Administration recently awarded $3 million to rural communities in eight states to reduce opioid overdoses.  Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Maya Springhawk Robnett / KAWC Colorado River Public Media

Arizona Western College in Yuma recently hosted high-school students from around the city for an FFA conference.  KAWC’s Maya Springhawk Robnett reports…

City of Yuma

A citywide tech project will change the border community of Yuma. City officials tout the economic benefits and improved public safety. Others worry about their privacy. Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Maya Springhawk Robnett / KAWC Colorado River Public Media

Law enforcement agencies across the country have been evaluating their fleets in light of a possible defect. One of the most widely-used patrol vehicles is under scrutiny. But as Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports, some local police departments aren’t that concerned…

John Boelts

Ten farmers and ranchers from around the country will spend the next two years learning how to share their trade with the general public, thanks to a program by the American Farm Bureau.   Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

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