Rachel Martin

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

After a record point drop on Monday, investors were nervous as the stock market opened this morning. Joining us now, NPR business reporter Jim Zarroli. Hey, Jim.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Good morning.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Up until just the other day, the stock market had been on a roll.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Yeah, we're talking about record highs. And President Trump has been taking credit.

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How do you live after you've died? That's the weighty question behind The Afterlives, a new novel by Thomas Pierce, a former producer at NPR who has become an award-winning author.

The book's main character, Jim Byrd, suffers sudden cardiac arrest at age 30 — and survives.

Atia Abawi is used to looking at war through the eyes of a journalist. She's made a career in news covering Iraq and Afghanistan — the latter being the country her own family fled in the early 1980s.

Increasingly though, Abawi has turned to fiction.

"It was a way for me as a journalist to go beyond those 700 words or that two-minute clip," she says. "To give insight in a way that I couldn't as a journalist, to give the full story, a depth that the reader could take in and find a way to empathize more with the people who are struggling."

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Depending on who you ask, this is a battle over the public's right to know or a battle over whether information is even worth knowing.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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