All Things Considered

Weekdays at 3 pm and weekends at 5 pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations. In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now another moment from today's total eclipse of the sun. Here are Carlyn (ph), Steven (ph) and 3-year-old Grace Meyer (ph) in Russellville, Ky.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KEVIN BUNCH: Hello, this is Kevin Bunch (ph). I was in Lebanon, Tenn., for the eclipse, came down here to get married.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

NPR listeners are sharing their stories of the eclipse today.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And now another moment from the eclipse.

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA

The excitement has been building for weeks and weeks. On Monday, August 21st the solar eclipse will finally be here. It will darken the skies along a path from Oregon to South Carolina. It's the first eclipse that will be seen from coast to coast in 99 years. Millions will don special glasses or watch through pinhole projectors. Eclipse enthusiasts say totality never disappoints. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DWANE BROWN, HOST:

And finally, yesterday, we asked you to contribute to our solar eclipse soundtrack. Here's what you came up with.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THAT'S AMORE")

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