Arizona Science Desk

Reporting on science, technology and innovation in Arizona and the Southwest through a collaboration from Arizona NPR member stations. This project is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Additional stories from the Arizona Science Desk are posted at our collaborating station, KJZZ: http://kjzz.org/science

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Southwest Monarch Study

Within the past two decades, the North American monarch butterfly population has plummeted.  To aid in its recovery, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation recently awarded $3 million in grants to various programs, including one in Arizona.  Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Bridgestone Americas

For decades, industries using rubber have looked for alternatives to supplement and back up their supply.  90% of natural rubber is from trees grown primarily in Southeast Asia.  Bridgestone Tires says a desert shrub could be the answer and they want to grow (and process) it in Southwest Arizona.  For the Arizona Science Desk, Maya Springhawk Robnett reports…

What: Community discussion with a panel of experts on "Climate Change: What Might We See in Yuma in the Next 30 Years?"

When: Wednesday, April 20, 5:30-7 pm

Where: The Patio Restaurant and Bar at the Hills, 1245 W Desert Hill Drive

How much: FREE with cash bar and regular menu available

Scientists Test Wasp As A Tool Against Citrus Greening

Apr 15, 2016
Amanda Solliday - KAWC

The plant disease citrus greening has hit Florida hard. Growers in other citrus-producing states, like Arizona, see it as a warning.

Researchers in San Luis are collecting new data on a wasp that may help slow the spread of the disease.

The parasitic wasp Tamarixia radiata is so small, scientists can ship 200 of them in a vial about the size of a photo film canister.

Bobby Baker, a technician with the USDA, has received weekly shipments of the vials for more than a year.

Hospice of Yuma

Dr. Clevis Parker joined the nonprofit Hospice of Yuma two months ago. Parker moved to Yuma from Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he was the medical director overseeing hospice and palliative care for multiple hospitals.

KAWC’s Amanda Solliday talked to Dr. Parker about his experiences in hospice care during his 15-year medical career and his goals for the new role in Yuma.

Solliday: What excites you about being the new medical director of Hospice of Yuma?

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