Arizona Science Desk

Reporting on science, technology and innovation in Arizona and the Southwest through a collaboration from Arizona NPR member stations. This project is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Additional stories from the Arizona Science Desk are posted at our collaborating station, KJZZ: http://kjzz.org/science

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Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

An invasive snake has been found in Yuma waters. Officials are concerned because the snakes could pose a threat to local species and alter the Colorado River ecosystem. Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Maya Springhawk Robnett / Arizona Science Desk; KAWC

The U.S. western power grid went down on September 8, 2011.  At Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, this sparked the need for faster backup power.  What followed were plans between MCAS Yuma and Arizona Public Service to create something called a microgrid.  Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports...

Rosa Bevington, YCEDA Media Specialist / Yuma Center of Excellence for Desert Agriculture

International accounting firm Pricewaterhouse Coopers recently projected a 32-billion-dollar market for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle use in the agriculture industry. In Yuma County, farmers have already begun utilizing UAV or “drone” technology in the fields. Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Southwest Monarch Study

Within the past two decades, the North American monarch butterfly population has plummeted.  To aid in its recovery, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation recently awarded $3 million in grants to various programs, including one in Arizona.  Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Bridgestone Americas

For decades, industries using rubber have looked for alternatives to supplement and back up their supply.  90% of natural rubber is from trees grown primarily in Southeast Asia.  Bridgestone Tires says a desert shrub could be the answer and they want to grow (and process) it in Southwest Arizona.  For the Arizona Science Desk, Maya Springhawk Robnett reports…

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