Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has broken his leg in a bike crash outside of Geneva, the State Department has confirmed.

"Secretary Kerry broke his right femur in a bicycling accident this morning in Scionzier, France," State Department spokesman John Kirby says.

Updated at 7 p.m. EDT

Amtrak will be restoring rail service between Philadelphia and New York at 5:30 Monday morning, the rail service announced Sunday.

Service between the two cities had been shut down since Tuesday, when train 188 derailed in Philadelphia, killing eight and wounding more than 200.

The affected section of track is part of the Northeast Corridor — the busiest railroad in America.

American Pharoah is the king of the nation's horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday.

Ridden by Victor Espinoza, he left the other horses at Pimlico Race Course eating his mud; with an unofficial time of 1:58.46, he led by an impressive seven lengths.

If he can win the Belmont Stakes on June 6, he'll be the first Triple Crown winner since 1978.

American Pharoah, ridden by Victor Espinoza, has won the 141st Kentucky Derby with a time of 2:03:02.

He raced to victory before the largest Derby crowd ever — 170,513, reports The Associated Press.

American Pharoah, owned by Ahmed Zayat, was the favorite heading into the race at Churchill Downs in Louisville. He had to fight Firing Line and Dortmund for the victory; the three were neck-and-neck (and neck) for a stretch, but American Pharoah pulled ahead at the end. Firing Line came in second.

Jordan Spieth, 21, has won the Masters with a record-tying score, 18 under par.

Spieth led from the first round of the tournament in Augusta, Ga. — a feat last achieved by Raymond Floyd in 1976.

On Sunday, reports the AP, no other contender truly threatened Spieth's dominance:

No one got closer than three shots of the lead all day. Spieth shot a 2-under 70 to hold off Justin Rose and Phil Mickelson.

Rose, the 2013 U.S. Open champion playing in the final group of the major for the first time, and Mickelson were four shots back.