Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Lloyds Banking Group said Sunday that it would no longer allow the use of its credit cards to purchase Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies.

"Across Lloyds Bank, Bank of Scotland, Halifax and MBNA, we do not accept credit card transactions involving the purchase of cryptocurrencies," a company spokeswoman said in an email, according to Reuters.

Lloyds said it would block attempts to buy cryptocurrencies starting on Monday — a move that would make Lloyds, the largest British bank, the first to impose such a ban.

South Africa's ruling African National Congress party is holding meetings to decide the fate of President Jacob Zuma, who is under growing pressure to step down amid corruption allegations.

The party tried and failed to secure an agreement from the 75-year-old Zuma, who has ruled South Africa since 2009, to step down voluntarily. Zuma is apparently not budging and many in the party fear that his fading support could hurt their chances to retain the presidency if he stays on until elections in 2019.

North Korea's ceremonial leader, Kim Yong Nam, will visit South Korea as part of a high-level delegation attending the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics this week amid somewhat eased tensions between the bitter rivals.

Kim is the president of the Presidium of the Supreme People's Assembly and is the nominal head of North Korea, although nearly all real power is concentrated in the hands of third-generation hereditary ruler, Kim Jong Un.

A Wisconsin girl who pleaded guilty to stabbing a classmate as part of a bizarre attempt to gain favor with a fictional Internet character has been ordered committed to a mental institution for 40 years, the maximum penalty sought by prosecutors.

Fidel Castro Díaz-Balart, the eldest son of the late Cuban leader Fidel Castro, has taken his own life, Cuba's state media reports.

The 68-year-old "Fidelito," or "Little Fidel," as he was known, had been hospitalized for depression and was still being treated as an outpatient at the time of his suicide, according to Cuba's official newspaper, Granma.

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