Two Years Later, Water Release Continues to Bring Life to Colorado River

Nov 1, 2016

In 2014, one-hundred-six-thousand acre-feet of water made its way from Morelos Dam near Yuma into the parched Colorado River Delta as part of a joint environmental effort between the U.S. and Mexico. Two years later, researchers say the results are positive. Maya Springhawk Robnett of the Arizona Science Desk reports…

Two growing seasons after the water release, a monitoring team has found it supported bird life and plant life while recharging the groundwater in the delta.

Karl Flessa, a University of Arizona professor of geosciences and co-chief scientist of the monitoring team, says he thinks one lesson they’ve learned since the water release is that there may be better ways to restore the delta—by making use of Mexico’s irrigation systems to deliver the water directly where it is needed along the river.

“Restoration involves more than just putting water in a riverbed and hoping everything’s gonna turn out okay," Flessa says. “Just like a farmer wants to be efficient in how they use water, restoration groups are learning how to be efficient in using water to restore some of this native vegetation.”

Flessa says the release also has led to a decline in salt cedar, an invasive tree species and has promoted the growth of native cottonwoods and willows.