Arizona Science Desk

Reporting on science, technology and innovation in Arizona and the Southwest through a collaboration from Arizona NPR member stations. This project is funded in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Additional stories from the Arizona Science Desk are posted at our collaborating station, KJZZ: http://kjzz.org/science

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Invasive Palm Weevil Spotted In Arizona

Jul 20, 2015
Pest and Diseases Image Library, Bugwood.org

The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has announced the first confirmed sighting in Arizona of an insect pest that can damage and kill palms.

Amateur Astronomers Key To Mapping Kuiper Belt

Jul 18, 2015
Amanda Solliday-KAWC

As the New Horizons spacecraft moves beyond Pluto and scientists begin to sift through the data of the historic flyby on Tuesday, a group of citizen scientists is also taking a look at the solar system’s frontier. 

Coordinated by one of the New Horizons team members, amateur astronomers are focused on the Kuiper Belt, a band of frozen objects on the very outskirts of the solar system.

Wilting Disease Threatens Arizona's Lettuce Crop

Jul 17, 2015
Michael Matheron, University of Arizona

Growers in Arizona and around the world are concerned with the spread of a wilting disease present in soil that can damage lettuce.

In response, researchers and lettuce farmers are gathering in Yuma this fall to brainstorm ways to protect one of the region’s important crops.

Lettuce wilt looks as you might imagine — the fungus makes plants look dry and brown. The disease can kill the plant, too, if infected early — causing whole fields to be destroyed.

Yuma Ag Center, Visitors Bureau Win Tourism Award

Jul 2, 2015
Yuma Visitors Bureau

A recent change to Yuma’s Lettuce Days exposes thousands of visitors to ongoing research at a university farm. That effort has now been recognized with a statewide tourism award.

Amanda Solliday-KAWC

Outdoor recreation supporters are concerned the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund will expire in September 2015 without Congressional action.

For 50 years, the fund has helped pay for everything from national recreational areas to neighborhood parks, including the Yuma Riverfront Gateway Park, Lake Havasu State Park, the Grand Canyon and many others.

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